Hibernate Search

Validate Hibernate Search Input with an Analyzer

Stop Words Hibernate Search lets you easily assign an @Analyzer on Fields, which are used to process terms before they are written to the index. An anlyzer can be used for instance for stemming and removing of words which are so frequent that they are insignificant for the results. These are examples for stop words: [“a”, “an”, “and”, “are”, “as”, “at”, “be”, “but”, “by”, “for”, “if”, “in”, “into”, “is”, “it”, “no”, “not”, “of”, “on”, “or”, “such”, “that”, “the”, “their”, “then”, “there”, “these”, “they”, “this”, “to”, “was”, “will”, “with”]``` It is a common technique, to split input search terms into single keywords and use these keywords for combining a complex queries over several fields.

Using Hibernate Search with Spring Boot

Spring Boot is a framework, that makes it much easier to develop Spring based applications, by following a convention over configuration principle (while in contrast Spring critics claim that the framework’s principle is rather configuration over everything). In this article, I am going to provide an example how to achieve the following: Create a simple Web application based on Spring Boot Persist and access data with Hibernate Make it searchable with Hibernate Search (Lucine) I use Eclipse with a Gradle plugin for convenience.

Hibernate Search and Spring Boot: Building Bridges

Hibernate Search is a very convenient way for storing database content in a Lucine index and add fulltext search capabilities to data driven projects simply by annotating classes. It can be easily integrated into Spring Boot applications and as long as only the basic features are used, it works out of the box. The fun starts when the Autoconfiguration cannot find out how to properly configure things automatically, then it gets tricky quite quickly.